Pamplona Guide: Navigating the University of Navarra

The University of Navarra (UNAV) is the private university in Pamplona. The Opus Dei religious order founded it in 1952, making it relatively young by European standards. It is run by a religious group and mass is offered everyday in each of the schools, but by no means are all the students who attend UNAV Catholic. It is

The Edificio Central is the main administrative building at UNAV. The cafeterias in this building and in fcom are the two best on campus. Photo courtesy of Creative Commons

regarded as one if the best universities overall in Spain. The NY Times recently ranked universities with the most employable graduates. Out of all the universities in the world, Univ. of Navarra ranked 34th.

The Facultad de Comunicación (the journalism school, they call it fcom for short) is regarded as a top program for all three of the tracks they offer: journalism, audiovisual and PR/advertising. The journalism and audiovisual tracks were ranked No. 1 in Spain this year by El Mundo and the PR/advertising track ranked in the top third. The university is home to a well-regarded economics/business school, a school of architecture, a filosofía and letras program (liberal arts) and hosts a med school and teaching hospital.

Here’s a promotional video fcom students produced for their Patron Saints Day a few years ago. It shows you the creative side of the work they do and gives you a feel for what fcom looks like.

Credits

Spanish universities operate on the european college credit system known as European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). The general rule to convert ECTS credits to American credit hours is to divide the ECTS number in two. This can be confusing, but can also work out in you favor at times. Mizzou will round the credits up. For example. they will give you two hours of credit for a class designated three ECTS.

Classes

The Facultad de Comunicacíon hosts Malofiej, an international infographics competition and summit every March. World-renowned visual journalists come and give seminars, some of which are open to students.

Courses at UNAV are usually offered spring-only or fall-only. The curriculum is designed in such a way that students take most of their classes with other students in their track and select a couple electives (optativas) to take each year. Mizzou’s study abroad office requests that you propose several classes to take. You can look up classes on their website to see descriptions. Be sure to look for upper-level courses (tercer or cuarto curso) that are offered second semester (segundo cuatrimestre). A calendar view of when which is class is offered is also available. While you will propose your courses to Mizzou before you go, you won’t register until you get there. Proposing courses allows Mizzou to let you know how the courses you are interested in will transfer back. If you end up taking courses you didn’t propose, that’s OK. You can work with the international admissions office when you are abroad to ensure the classes you decide to take will transfer back.

If you are interested in taking a course outside of fcom, you can find course listings on the website. Most Mizzou students take at least three hours of Spanish, history, literature or some other subject area. Warning: the way courses are listed online can be tricky to navigate. It’s less efficient than MyZou, if that tells you anything. Here are some direct links to areas you might be interested in:

Other Helpful links:

International Student Guide (PDF, 2.9 MB)
Academic Calendar 2012-2013

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One thought on “Pamplona Guide: Navigating the University of Navarra

  1. Pingback: Pamplona Guide: Top six things to know about classes, exams and grades « Converged

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